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Kiddom + Open Up Resources: Best-in-Class Digital Curriculum

Kiddom + Open Up Resources: Best-in-Class Digital Curriculum

Abbas Manjee

Abbas Manjee

Chief Academic Officer, Kiddom

Abbas Manjee is Chief Academic Officer at Kiddom. Before Kiddom, Abbas taught high school math serving at-risk youth in New York City. 

Introducing digital curriculum to meet the personalization needs of schools and districts

Competency-based learning models are reshaping and transforming the workplace. As a result, schools around the world are redefining what it means to learn skills by adopting flexible, skills-based curriculum to emphasize mastery over “seat time.” At Kiddom, we believe schools can prepare students to succeed in the changing global economy by investing in high quality curriculum, which research names as a critical factor in academic success, and the means by which to personalize the content for students. 

To that end, we’re excited to announce a partnership with Open Up Resources (OUR) to offer schools and districts best-in-class curriculum delivered via the Kiddom education platform. This partnership is the first time a full course OER curriculum will be offered in a digital environment that allows for personalization via technology, while at a lower cost than traditional textbooks. 

Our joint mission is to deliver flexible, high quality curricula to one million students equitably via technology (1) to help teachers personalize instruction using best-in-class curriculum and (2) enable schools and districts to measure the ROI on curriculum and ensure students are set up for success in the 21st century.

What Digital Curriculum is Now Available?

Our partnership with Open Up Resources offers schools and districts three distinct curricula, two of which recently earned high ratings from EdReports, an independent nonprofit that reviews K–12 curricula for standards alignment and quality. Under EdReports’ extensive review process, diverse groups of highly trained educators review and score each curriculum against detailed rubrics.

    Open Up Resources Math (Grades 6-8).

    This curriculum received an unprecedented high score from EdReports. In fact, it’s the highest rating for a math curriculum on EdReports, as well as the first and only middle school math series to receive the highest designation by EdReports in all three review categories.

    EL Education Language Arts (Grades K-5).

    This curriculum is another top-rated K–5 ELA curriculum on EdReports. It also earned a “Tier 1” rating by the Louisiana Department of Education. It has been proven to improve literacy outcomes, higher-order thinking, and teacher effectiveness when paired with professional learning.

    Reading with Relevance SEL (Grades 2-12).

    This curriculum was approved by the Center for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) as an academically-integrated SEL program. It’s an evidence-based social and emotional learning program. Its modular nature enables teachers to adopt units independently or supplement ELA curriculum and/or after-school programs. 

    Three Ways the OUR:Kiddom Partnership Bridges the Gap Between Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

    1. Digitally manage OUR’s high-quality curriculum

    Curriculum is centralized and connected to instructional delivery for real-time visibility into student and instructional data. Teachers save time on lesson planning, and use technology for data-informed instruction and intervention. No need to spend hours in Google Drive piecemealing together scope and sequence and unit plans.

    2. Enable teacher autonomy and student ownership

    Using Kiddom, individualization and differentiation is timely and targeted, with technology to assign standards-based OUR curriculum and supplemental resources, assess and track students by mastery, and create individual learning pathways. Great teachers connect content to their students’ lives and this gives teachers the time to do just that.

    3. Keep students on track by acting on real-time data

    When curriculum artifacts like unit and lesson plans can be traced down to assessment results, educators gain the power to act in real-time. Insights into instructional and performance trends will make it easier than ever to measure implementation fidelity and ensure ROI, while also delivering the right data to every member of the learning community. When you can form an intricate web of support around students, intervention can happen at exactly the right time.

    Ready to go digital with your school’s curriculum?

    Many states in the U.S. are spending less per student today than they were before the Great Recession. While some superintendents remain enthusiastic about the future of their district, they are less excited about the future of American public education. If education is to be the American engine of opportunity and mobility, schools and districts will need to get scrappier with their funds. The majority of school funding goes towards instructional staff and administrators. Rethinking how we support instructional staff and how to thoughtfully incorporate education technologies can create the conditions necessary to most optimally stretch dollars.

    Digital curriculum delivered via a centralized hub for teaching and learning offers cash-strapped schools and districts significant cost savings. It reduces reliance on expensive, quickly out-of-date textbooks, many of which do not meet individual student needs. In addition, our bundled curriculum and platform reduces the redundancies found in many district technology ecosystems. So as we work toward our joint mission, we’re excited to help more schools and districts achieve the wonderful things that were previously thought out of budget. To learn more about taking advantage of this partnership today, click here.

    Today marks an exciting milestone, but we’re just getting started. Thanks for being with us on this journey! 💜

    At a typical Kiddom school, hands are in the air, there’s a buzz in the room, and teachers and students are energized. Kiddom was designed to help improve teacher retention and increase student performance and graduation rates.

    For the first time, the most important parts of teaching and learning are connected and simplified in Kiddom. Curriculum lives in one place and is easily measured and refined, instruction is personalized to meet the needs of each student, and data serves as a powerful system of support for every member of the learning community to keep students on track.

    What People Are Saying

    “Kiddom is great for assessing data and then assigning appropriate work based on individual student performance. I love that it's very easy to attach standards and rubric to every assignment.”

    Jackie Curts, Middle School Teacher

    “Using Kiddom has made me stop and ask, ‘Am I just letting this student repeat what they already know, or am I really challenging them?’”

    Ann Leghorn, High School Literacy Specialist

    “I can see where my class and any student is at any moment in their educational journey. This way, I can take action to assist them to work towards mastery.”

    Mr. Albrecht, High School Teacher

    You might also be interested in these articles:

    How to Make the Most of Parent-Teacher Conferences

    How to Make the Most of Parent-Teacher Conferences

    As a former New York City high school teacher, I know that parent-teacher conferences seldom provide parents with enough time to process what their children learned, what they’re interested in, and what needs improvement. These conferences are rarely original and are often a missed opportunity to truly connect with parents about something beyond the report card.

    In contrast, my own parent-teacher conferences were student-centered — creating space for meaningful discussion about things other than grades. But if I’m being transparent, I have to confess I didn’t intentionally structure them that way. I credit technology — and superheroes.

    3 Tips for Making Parent Conferences More Student-Centered

    1. Deliver engaging, culturally-responsive curriculum:

    Budgeting for superheroes was always a hit in my algebra class. I provided students with a superhero’s historical financials and challenged them to figure out a way to redirect more cash towards their characters’ “superhero needs.” That could mean more Iron Man suits for Tony Stark or a better sewing machine for Peter Parker. My students dominated the family conferences after the superhero unit, presenting their work to parents, aunts, uncles, older siblings, other teachers — literally anyone who would listen. “Mom, this is the project I want to show you,” said one student. “Look how I saved Iron Man thousands of dollars by just paying off his credit cards. Now he doesn’t pay interest, which means he’s not wasting money!”

    In these conferences, we spoke little about grades and missing work because I had provided that information to my students in real-time throughout the semester, which meant conferences became a space to talk about what was being learned rather than what was missing.

    2. Be transparent about a student’s progress—before parents show up:

    Despite emerging digital communication tools that seek to bring parents and teachers closer, the structure of parent-teacher conferences largely remains the same: “Here’s how Susie did. Here’s our wall of work. That’s her worksheet with a sticker on it. Oh, and she really needs to stop throwing erasers at Laila.”

    Often, “what needs improvement” dominates the conversation. And if parents must endure this in multiple classrooms with multiple teachers, it does not provide the incentive to come back next time.

    I definitely did not have something like the superhero project culminate before every parent-teacher conference — that would have felt forced. If my students didn’t have a project to talk about, they reflected on their favorite topics in class or their increased sense of confidence grappling with mathematics.

    Grades were never the centerpiece of the conversation because I invested a lot of time and effort ensuring my students and their families could access their class progress and grades before conferences — in fact, anytime they wanted during the semester. Providing students with access to grades in real-time — and providing them with a means to improve their work — redefined the parent-teacher conference experience. Conferences became a wonderful opportunity for parents to see and hear their children in action.

    On Kiddom, students can access to their achievement data at any time to track growth and progress.

     

    I set a minimum expectation for myself to update my gradebook on a daily basis. In my first year teaching math, I built and maintained a complex gradebook using Google Sheets. I inserted the sheet onto my class homepage and made it publicly accessible for students to track themselves. (Of course, I replaced names with ID numbers). It looked more like a financial model than a gradebook — and it was ugly . But its existence made students rush to the computer to monitor their progress. Sometimes students would leave comments in spreadsheet cells with their grades and tag me in it, “Thought I turned this in, can you print me another?”

    Grades not only became accessible, but my students no longer had to wait until progress reports to ask for additional work to get them on their way; instead, this became an ongoing practice. I had effectively created the conditions necessary for my students to self-advocate, which, as I would later learn, meant parent-teacher conferences would be less of a performance review.

    3. Connect curriculum & data in a way that benefits teachers, learners, and guardians:

    Education technology has typically ignored the student experience. That’s unfortunate, because students today move fast and are incredibly tech-savvy. And from what we’ve gathered, teachers are constantly looking to empower students to take control of their learning.

    As report card season for the school year gets underway, I encourage educators to do their due diligence. Do the research on tools that can minimize the information asymmetry between teachers and learners. I’m not keen on public data walls to achieve this, because I’ve witnessed students get demoralized after tracking their performance against peers in public spaces. And I wouldn’t build a gradebook from scratch again either. That’s too time-consuming to maintain and, at this point, there are plenty of free gradebooks out there that offer a simple student-facing portal to get you on your way.

    On Kiddom, students actively communicate with teachers to get the feedback they need.

     

    At Kiddom, we deliver a product that can give students ownership of their own learning. The student experience on Kiddom allows students to access and submit work, track their own progress, and solicit feedback from teachers—all from one place.

    My experience in classrooms has taught me that it’s possible for technology to transform parent-teacher conferences. But technology isn’t going to redefine parent-teacher conferences for you; it’s only an enabler. So before you set out to restructure your parent-teacher conference, be sure to set up the practices you’ll need for success: Empower students with their own achievement data, but be sure to keep them updated. Then, design a way for your students to access remediation and/or enrichment resources on their own.

    If you can do that, the possibilities for student ownership are endless.

    Kiddom + Open Up Resources: Best-in-Class Digital Curriculum

    We’re excited to announce a partnership with Open Up Resources (OUR) to offer schools and districts best-in-class curriculum delivered via the Kiddom education platform.

    Building a Web of Support for Students: What We Learned

    Merging data with qualitative instincts should be the standard in education—not a privilege. A visit to Greenville, SC gave us a glimpse into that future.

    Principal Pam Gildersleeve-Hernandez: The Collaborative Leader

    Former Principal & Superintendent Pam Gildersleeve-Hernandez has had a lengthy career of advocating for teachers and using technology to enhance education.

    Back to School Checklist: Are You Ready?

    Some teachers may be waving a white flag in October, while others decorate it with Sharpie! Find out which one you’ll be with this back to school quiz.

    Welcome Back to School: A Letter From Our CAO

    This week all Kiddom employees (many of whom are former educators) received the following letter from our CAO. We were so inspired, we had to share!

    More School Improvement Articles:

    Building a Web of Support for Students: What We Learned

    Building a Web of Support for Students: What We Learned

    Abbas Manjee

    Abbas Manjee

    Chief Academic Officer, Kiddom

    Abbas Manjee is Chief Academic Officer at Kiddom. Before Kiddom, Abbas taught high school math serving at-risk youth in New York City. 

    This is the 2nd blog of a 2-part series around Early Warning Response Systems. Learn more about what we hoped to achieve in the first blog here.

    Traditionally, schools have held academic data at the core of intervention frameworks. Student performance is often what determines funding, reaches families, and defines the success of a learning community. But functionally, schools are so much more than report card dispensaries. They act as community pillars by offering social support, enrichment opportunities, flu shots, ballot boxes, and everything in between.

    The role of an educator is expected to cover the same breadth—but without giving the same weight to student interests and circumstances as we give to performance data. What would it take to enable a holistic approach to intervention in schools? Earlier this year, I was fortunate enough to visit Greenville County Schools in South Carolina and find out.

    “Every staff member is a student advocate.”

    — Jeff McCoy, Associate Superintendent for Academics at Greenville County Schools

    The OnTrack Greenville intervention framework draws from three fundamental indicators of regression: attendance, behavior, and course completion (ABCs). The data is kept simple, making it much easier for teachers to input and refer to it as frequently as they find it necessary or helpful. But to combine these three factors and assess the full picture as intended, there needs to be more than one observer and contributor. 

    Upon observation, it’s more suitable to label their early warning response system as a network: schools and districts can’t initiate an RTI without respondents, or enable an MTSS without supporters. Every staff member is trained on protocols and brought into the framework for intervention. By tapping on the professional instincts and dexterity of every employee, OnTrack Greenville provides each student with multiple layers of support.

    The Playbook

    With the OnTrack framework, Greenville County can take targeted action to prevent delays in matriculation. For individual students, these include interventions such as reading support, counseling, speech therapy, and 1:1 instruction. At the classroom level, OnTrack lends itself to equity for students by pondering the questions: 

    • Are all teachers managing behavior issues the same way? 
    • Do the final grades in a course match student data on individual assignments?

    Schools can use an early warning response system like Greenville’s to support social-emotional development and academic performance side by side. Principals at OnTrack schools can expect to see absenteeism and behavior incidents drop by at least 25% year over year.

    The ability to merge data with qualitative instincts should be the standard for schools—not a privilege.

    Of the 101 schools in the district, it has taken nearly 10 years to implement the OnTrack framework at 30 Greenville schools. It is expensive, both in human time and money—principals are out of the building for a day and a half each month, and weekly staff meetings can take 90 minutes or more. Most notably, responding to a regression in attendance simply must take place outside of the school. To intervene, a staff member might drive to a student’s house and offer to bring them to school, or meet with the guardians present.

    Greenville County was able to build their early warning response system thanks in large part to a generous $9 million donation by the United Way. Many school districts will never catch the same luck, and they shouldn’t have to: the ability to merge data with qualitative instincts should be the standard for K-12 education—not a privilege. 

    At Kiddom, we’re imagining a future with no barriers to schools that want to comprehensively support their students. The most remarkable takeaway from our visit to Greenville was immersing into a network that proves these conditions are within reach.

    At a typical Kiddom school, hands are in the air, there’s a buzz in the room, and teachers and students are energized. Kiddom was designed to help improve teacher retention and increase student performance and graduation rates.

    For the first time, the most important parts of teaching and learning are connected and simplified in Kiddom. Curriculum lives in one place and is easily measured and refined, instruction is personalized to meet the needs of each student, and data serves as a powerful system of support for every member of the learning community to keep students on track.

    What People Are Saying

    “Kiddom is great for assessing data and then assigning appropriate work based on individual student performance. I love that it's very easy to attach standards and rubric to every assignment.”

    Jackie Curts, Middle School Teacher

    “Using Kiddom has made me stop and ask, ‘Am I just letting this student repeat what they already know, or am I really challenging them?’”

    Ann Leghorn, High School Literacy Specialist

    “I can see where my class and any student is at any moment in their educational journey. This way, I can take action to assist them to work towards mastery.”

    Mr. Albrecht, High School Teacher

    Welcome Back to School: A Letter From Our CAO

    Welcome Back to School: A Letter From Our CAO

    Abbas Manjee

    Abbas Manjee

    Chief Academic Officer, Kiddom

    Abbas Manjee is Chief Academic Officer at Kiddom. Before Kiddom, Abbas taught high school math serving at-risk youth in New York City. 

    A little back to school cheer — This week all Kiddom employees (many of whom are former educators) received the following letter from our Chief Academic Officer, Abbas Manjee. We were super inspired by it, so we had to share!

    Kiddom Team,

    School is officially back in session.  

    This time of year impacts an entire ecosystem of folks we serve:

    1. Students, who may be excited to reconnect with friends and keep learning to feed their budding curiosity 
    2. Teachers, who may be ecstatic to implement the good and hard lessons learned last year
    3. Administrators, who may be anxious to see their school or district vision implemented with fidelity
    4. Parents/Guardians, who may be so proud of their kids they might cry alone in the car the morning the first day of school

    To kick this season off, I’d like you to meet Mr. Smith (name anonymized for privacy):

     

    Mr. Smith is the proud father of Jack (also anonymized), who consistently struggled in high school. On this day, Mr. Smith learned his son had passed a key mathematics exam, which had been preventing Jack from graduating high school for three consecutive years. I was Jack’s math teacher, but I had never met his father. Mr. Smith showed up to my school and demanded to see me. Our school administrative assistant called me out of the classroom and pointed me out to him. 

    Mr. Smith came running at me like a madman. He lifted me up, and shortly after this photo was taken, he put me down and started sobbing on my shoulder. School is a funny place. It’s where families come together to share and make their hopes and dreams a reality. 

    Four years ago, Kiddom evolved from offering math games on iPads to a platform designed to support all teachers. The work of teachers impacts generations at scale. All of us have been inspired, challenged, and elevated by teachers. They’ve guided, supported, and provided us with a bedrock of knowledge that will forever shape who we are. 

    Don’t forget that. 

    As such, it’s imperative we connect our day-to-day work back to the people we truly work for. Every code review, every outbound sequence, and every UI mock at Kiddom can significantly impact young people. It’s critical we focus even harder in the coming weeks, months, and years because the young people we serve today are growing up in a time where the future appears less promising than the future we were brought up in (e.g. here, here, and here).

    Ultimately, I don’t care about making a list on Business Insider. We need to work harder towards unlocking potential for teachers and learners because our work helps prepare young people to make data-informed decisions about themselves and the world around them. And young people are our future.

    Get some rest this weekend; the world doesn’t change itself.

    Thank you,

    –  Abbas

    At a typical Kiddom school, hands are in the air, there’s a buzz in the room, and teachers and students are energized. Kiddom was designed to help improve teacher retention and increase student performance and graduation rates.

    For the first time, the most important parts of teaching and learning are connected and simplified in Kiddom. Curriculum lives in one place and is easily measured and refined, instruction is personalized to meet the needs of each student, and data serves as a powerful system of support for every member of the learning community to keep students on track.

    What People Are Saying

    “Kiddom is great for assessing data and then assigning appropriate work based on individual student performance. I love that it's very easy to attach standards and rubric to every assignment.”

    Jackie Curts, Middle School Teacher

    “Using Kiddom has made me stop and ask, ‘Am I just letting this student repeat what they already know, or am I really challenging them?’”

    Ann Leghorn, High School Literacy Specialist

    “I can see where my class and any student is at any moment in their educational journey. This way, I can take action to assist them to work towards mastery.”

    Mr. Albrecht, High School Teacher

    You might also be interested in these articles:

    Curriculum is Culture

    Responding to a recent shift from curriculum analysis to culture change, author Geoffrey Schmidt argues that the two cannot be separated.

    Introducing Responsive Curriculum Management

    Introducing Responsive Curriculum Management

    Abbas Manjee

    Abbas Manjee

    Chief Academic Officer, Kiddom

    Abbas Manjee is Chief Academic Officer at Kiddom. Before Kiddom, Abbas taught high school math serving at-risk youth in New York City. 

    Responsive Curriculum Management provides visibility into classroom progress so you can build systems of continuous improvement

    Well-designed curriculum affords teachers the opportunity to help students meaningfully connect with the subject matter and engage in deeper learning. In fact, a growing body of research confirms curriculum is a critical factor in academic success.

    While these findings might seem obvious, measuring the efficacy of curriculum gets tricky because of the diverse nature of classrooms: teachers modify curriculum to best suit their students, based on the resources and training available to them, and their preferred teaching style. This is what makes teaching and learning beautiful and so powerfully personal.

    However, some consistency across classrooms and schools can help school and district leaders make better meaning of student achievement data. Without clear and consistent learning goals and strong curricular design, it can be challenging for administrators to ensure transparency, accountability, and alignment across learning communities.

     

    What Challenges Exist Today?

    Two challenges make measuring and improving curriculum difficult for administrators.

    The first is that curriculum artifacts are generally disconnected from teachers’ day-to-day work. Whether curriculum is purchased from a publisher, adopted from a free provider (e.g. EngageNY), or completely custom, it generally lives in either a curriculum management product or Google Drive/Microsoft Office.

    If a school or district relies on a curriculum management product, teachers generally access it at the beginning and end of a term. What the curriculum produces, i.e. the student achievement data, is housed in a gradebook or a learning management system, siloed from the curriculum.

    If schools rely on Google Drive or Microsoft Office, collaboration and on-the-go course adjustment gets easier, but there is no way to look at holistic student data and content side by side. To measure the effectiveness of a unit plan housed in a curriculum management product or a Google Doc, administrators must first gather the lesson plans associated with that unit and then separately pull the student achievement data from another source. This practice results in administrators spending far too much time gathering information instead of acting on it to better support classroom instruction.

    The second challenge that administrators face is that curriculum is a living, breathing roadmap. What’s agreed upon at the beginning of the term never proves enough once the term gets underway, and so it must be fine-tuned on an ongoing basis. This is reality of curriculum design: the work is never done. 

    This is why, despite the plethora of curriculum products and services that exist today, teachers still report spending twelve hours a week searching for or creating curricular materials. How much do these additional materials impact student achievement? How could teachers’ lives be improved if curriculum developers at the district office could access the additional materials teachers found and used on an ongoing basis to fine-tune curriculum? 

    After months of researching, designing, engineering, and testing solutions for this problem, the Kiddom team is excited to introduce Responsive Curriculum Management on Kiddom Academy to help everyone support the work happening in classrooms more effectively.

     

    Responsive Curriculum Management

     

    Using Responsive Curriculum Management, curriculum developers can design and share standards-aligned curriculum directly to their teachers’ Kiddom Planner. The curriculum can be designed centrally in-house, co-designed with teachers, or adapted from a publisher.

    When teachers access their respective Planners via Kiddom Classroom, they can view the curriculum map and collaborate with colleagues to build a collection of lessons and activities designed with their students in mind.

    Student-facing artifacts from the curriculum, e.g. assessments, quizzes, intervention resources, can be used by teachers and accessed by students directly via Timeline in Kiddom Classroom. Additionally, there are many options to personalize assignments to meet student needs.

    As teachers and students move through the planned curriculum, school and district leaders can monitor live classroom performance, at any moment. They can view which units, lessons, and activities are driving student outcomes, and follow overall student progress in all subjects. 

    This visibility helps administrators make timely and data-informed decisions on how to allocate resources, from the contents of professional development sessions to the purchasing of curriculum or intervention materials. Administrators can finally measure the impact curriculum makes from design, delivery, and assessment, across classrooms and schools, in real-time. That’s a game-changer, folks. 

    How to Bridge Curriculum, Instruction, & Assessment with Kiddom:

    Getting Started

    Using Academy, you can easily add a new course to share with teachers.

    Build and Share Curriculum

    Administrators can add units, standards, and other details, then click into any teacher’s curriculum to view what resources have been added to Planner.

    Implement, Teach, & Assess

    Teachers can access the curriculum designed and distributed schoolwide, and use it by simply dragging resources from Planner and dropping them into a student’s Timeline.

    Measure the Impact

    Administrators using Kiddom for Schools & Districts can track classroom data such as student engagement, student achievement (shown to right), as well as teacher and student dashboards. Read more here.

    Review, Reflect, and Adjust Course

    Responsive Curriculum Management on Kiddom Academy effectively bridges the gap between curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Calibrate on academic expectations and take action on classroom data to make sure teachers have everything they need for a successful school year.

    While classes are in session, make informed decisions to support student learning in a timely manner. After the classes are done, you’ll finally have everything you need, all in one place to review, reflect, and adjust course for next time.

    Curriculum is a Roadmap

    Curriculum design is fundamentally emotional work, representing the journey educators plan for students to make meaningful connections with concepts. How curriculum is implemented in the classroom is a significant predictor of student achievement gains. Now that Responsive Curriculum Management is available, we’re excited to learn how administrators will use it to support the work happening in classrooms.

    Ready to align curriculum, instruction, and assessment? Learn more by completing this inquiry form. We’d love to support you in this work.

    At a typical Kiddom school, hands are in the air, there’s a buzz in the room, and teachers and students are energized. Kiddom was designed to help improve teacher retention and increase student performance and graduation rates.

    For the first time, the most important parts of teaching and learning are connected and simplified in Kiddom. Curriculum lives in one place and is easily measured and refined, instruction is personalized to meet the needs of each student, and data serves as a powerful system of support for every member of the learning community to keep students on track.

    What People Are Saying

    “Kiddom is great for assessing data and then assigning appropriate work based on individual student performance. I love that it's very easy to attach standards and rubric to every assignment.”

    Jackie Curts, Middle School Teacher

    “Using Kiddom has made me stop and ask, ‘Am I just letting this student repeat what they already know, or am I really challenging them?’”

    Ann Leghorn, High School Literacy Specialist

    “I can see where my class and any student is at any moment in their educational journey. This way, I can take action to assist them to work towards mastery.”

    Mr. Albrecht, High School Teacher

    You might also be interested in these articles:

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